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The ORC, As it Was, No Longer Exists

The Is were dotted and the Ts crossed and the Offshore Committee of the ISAF became a reality at the Council Meeting

November 19, 2001
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LISBON, Portugal–The Is were dotted and the Ts crossed and the Offshore Committee of the ISAF became a reality at the Council Meeting that concluded the Federation’s annual gathering. It has four sub-committees answering to it — the Oceanic, Offshore One-Design, Special Regulations, and International Regulations — and there is a permanent working party to steer it. In addition, it will administer the recognized handicap systems while an International Handicap System sub-committee will supply it with detailed workings of the IMS.

The Working Party, to implement the objectives of the 2000 ISAF/ORC Agreement will consist of David Kellett (AUS) Chairman, Hans Zuiderbaan (NED), Bruno Finzi (ITA), Wolfgang Schaefer (GER), the RYA/RORC’s representative Paul King, the US Sailing nominee, James Muldoon, and the Chairman of the Constitution Committee, Jack Caldwell (USA). Twenty-seven members were elected from 41 nominations to the Offshore Committee, including Muldoon and John Osmond (USA).

It was as neat a merger as might’ve been planned and it was made without much turmoil. Such misgivings as may have been expressed were only to be expected and were made privately. As required, office accommodation for the IMS staff (still funded by what has effectively become a Class Association) will be available at the ISAF Secretariat in Southampton and the Secretary General will provide staff support for the assistance of the Offshore Committee.

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While all this is settling, four one-design classes, the IC-45, Farr 40, Mumm 30 and Mumm 36, sought to be administered by the Keelboat Committee rather than the Offshore Committee, and the request was formally granted.

The Offshore Committee will direct the Oceanic Sub-Committee to study singlehanded ocean racing and make note of the particular challenges it presents, particularly with regard to design, safety, and communications.

The weight limit for the crew of the Yngling at the Olympics was settled at 205kg and the Keelboat Committee is to study exactly how this should be implemented so that the women should not suffer medically. It was considered that crash dieting and fluid loss for the start of a regatta were unhealthy practices and that it is perhaps best to weigh competitors throughout the regatta,

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The Yngling came under review in terms of its mould and building. Single and double-bottomed boats now have the same minimum weight limit and only boats built from ISAF approved moulds after Jan. 1, 2002 shall be eligible for the Olympics. As for next year, there will be a separate women’s start at the world championship, which is an Olympic qualifying regatta.

The Tasar and 29er were granted International Status, as were the Open 60 and the Hobie Tiger.

http://www.sailing.org

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