Blue Skies and Shifty Breezes Hallmarks the Second Day of the 2001 Chicago NOOD Regatta.

Overnight Cold Front Makes Conditions Challenging

Blue skies, cooler temperatures, and shifty breezes were the hallmarks of the second day of the 2001 Chicago NOOD regatta. The passage of a cold front overnight brought conditions that could easily be summed up as challenging.
"We were over early in the second race," said John Musa, owner of the ID35 Jacaibon. "After re-starting, we just headed for a wind line that turned into a huge shift. It was one of those dreams that every sailor should have." Musa, who has been attending NOOD regattas for five years, first with his S2 7.9, and now with his 1D35 turned that wind shift into a first place finish, helping to put Jacaibon within three points of first place overall. Wind shifts also helped one of Musa's competitors; "Hippie Chick was last in the second race," said Musa. "And with all the shifts, was able to climb back to second. They did a hell of a job."

John Mollicone, skipper of the J/24 Pipe Dream and sailing coach at Brown University has a three-point lead in the J/24 class. "It was shifty and puffy out there today," he said. "Our race circle was close to Chicago and conditions were really wild because we were so close to the shore. Tactically we were great. Scott Norris (sailing coach at the University of Rhode Island), did a great job."Pipe Dream and crew are in the middle of a campaign for the 2002 J/24 Worlds, to be held in Kingston, Ontario. "We’re doing as many regattas as we can," says Mollicone. "We’ll be in Cleveland next weekend for a J/24 regatta that’s a qualifier for the Worlds." Three points ahead and one race to go is not a regatta won but Mollicone knows what needs to be done on Sunday. "I’ve been over early twice in this event," he said. "We’ve been a little too aggressive. We’ll concentrate on boat speed and tactics and sail conservatively tomorrow. All we need to do is place fourth or better."